This is the second book I have read in the last two months concerning the fear that robots and other machines powered by artificial intelligence will take over many professions in the next twenty years. Jay Richards’ book, The Human Advantage: The Future of American Work in an Age of Smart Machines, the author reminded …

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My weeks in the middle of October are crowded with patients – often patients I am not supposed to see since they are over 18 and my program does not extend beyond 18 years. These patients, however, know me and I know them. They turn first to someone they know, and I have told them …

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Once again this week, I have been thinking about graduations. Graduation is the main topic of discussion for many of my patients. I have attended seven more graduations since Monday, most of them for Algonquin College. Last Monday, I wrote about what I could tell from graduate’s shoes. This week, I looked up, into the …

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I have been attending graduation ceremonies this year. I attended my son’s graduation, some of my patients’ graduations and graduations for the College where I am a Governor. As I watch the graduates cross the stage, I find myself wanting to know more about them and their struggle. I want to know more about them …

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There are six million young Canadians starting school this week. From busy, excited little kindergartners to oh, so bored almost adults in their finally final year, yellow buses and slower streets will signal the end of summer as nothing else does. At the psychiatric hospital where I work, we have four classrooms, all part of …

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