How to Manage a Suicide Pact

Recently at a Montreal high school, 62 high school students made a suicide pact. As the story broke last week, the Montreal Gazette revealed that school officials had determined the three people who started the pact, who claimed that it was a prank. The article also quoted a school official as saying that “some of the students did not know what they were signing because only the first sheet indicated that it was a suicide pact”. No doubt school personnel were trying to allay the fears of the public, and more importantly, parents of students at College d’Anjou, a private high school in Montreal’s east end.

I learned about this situation when I was asked to comment and provide advice for Global News. I found the tone of school officials, as characterized by the Montreal Gazette, to be troubling. We know too much in 2017 not to be concerned whenever news of a suicide pact emerges, especially among youth between 15 and 24 years old. During these years, suicide is the second most common cause of death.

Some of the other facts that ought to have engendered more concern are the actual statistics about suicide and suicide attempts in Canada. The Canadian Mental Health Association has found that 34% of youth between the ages of 15 and 24 have contemplated suicide – one third. Also, the actual number of suicide attempts in this population in Canada is 8%. Both the rate of contemplation and the rate of attempts increases when there is a suicide pact. The acceptance implied in a suicide pact reduces a young person’s emotional barriers to suicide and so the risk increases.

What should happen when a school learns of a suicide pact? There are 3 direct steps that might help. The first step consists of education through assemblies. Bring all concerned together, in this case the entire student body along with their parents and other interested family members, e.g. siblings. Have an experienced resource person speak to this group about what to do to reassure themselves that their family member will be okay. This person can direct the assembly to resources for Mental Health First Aid as well as to local crisis and emergency services. There will be lots of questions about both the general subject of suicide and suicide pacts and about the specific situation. The resource person and school personnel should be prepared to address these. The school personnel must be prepared to address concerns openly, without judgment, and compassionately. This is not a time to be defensive. It is a time to make sure you have support moving forward should there be a need for further mental health assistance.

The second step must involve meetings with mental health professionals for each person involved in the pact. The best scenario is that one third of these youth were contemplating suicide and it is important to reach out and find help for these young people.

Finally, it is an important time to remind everyone of these three circumstances that indicate an increased risk of suicide in a young person:
1. Increased use of alcohol and drugs.
2. Giving away one’s belongings.
3. Signs and symptoms of depression or a history of depression.

Doing all of this is a good start to preventing suicide, but suicide and suicide attempts are symptoms of a serious medical illness. People die of serious illnesses. In some cases, such as this, these deaths can be prevented.

If anyone reading this has questions, please ask. The best way to prevent suicide is to talk about it openly and without judgment.