Holiday Coverage

This is the second year that I have been Clinical Director of the Youth Program at my hospital and, like last year, I am covering for my colleagues on the working days between December 25, 2017 and January 2, 2018. There are three work days during this period and our various programs include approximately 500 patients. That is a lot of youth and families who may need support during this time of year that can be very difficult.

While I am the only psychiatrist in my program available during this period, a few allied health staff will also be working but we are already contemplating what services to offer. My goal is that those youth and families who need it will get support, but that those of us supporting will have balanced, even enjoyable, workdays in the spirit of the season.
What will we do? Let me tell you what we’re contemplating and, if anyone feels inclined, I would be grateful for any input or ideas.

We will begin by providing all our patients with lists of local resources for families, such as the crisis lines, as well as the opening hours of the walk-in program for youth mental health. We will also provide lists of things to do that are inexpensive or free, since diversion can often take one’s mind off difficult feelings. We will especially direct families toward outdoor activities. There’s nothing like a few hours freezing together on a skating rink to get mood-improving endorphins flowing.

We’ll also provide other lists: a list of movies that can help when people are anxious or depressed and lists of TV shows that families can watch together. For those who don’t like the idea of too much screen time, there are read-aloud book lists. A visit to the library to pick up books, movies and music is an inexpensive, warm outing.

But let’s think for a moment of those who must in this season, when the emphasis for so many is on joy and miracles, visit us at the hospital because there is no joy and a miracle would be just one reasonable day.

We are thinking of having a group, for anyone who needs it: for youth, parent, sibling, aunt, grandfather. It will be more psychoeducation than psychotherapy. We will remind everyone of three important self-help activities:

1. Rest.
2. Eat.
3. Do something fun every day.

I repeat these here because these are good for all of us to remember. These few days off are a perfect time to sleep in, go for long walks and have long conversations with people. We will remind those who need support that we are not the only ones they can talk to. I am certain that every youth in our program has someone who would love to have a conversation with them. We will remind them of that and help them remember who that might be.

I have always preferred to work Christmas than New Year’s – at Christmas, everyone works hard for the day to be positive, filled with good food and the best company. New Year’s is about resolutions and regrets and doing better, as if we all forget the message of the previous week.

I like to be part of the group of doctors and health care providers working hard for everyone’s holiday to be happy and healthy. It seems like a singularly good use of my time and it is possible to make a real difference for people just by reminding them to rest, to eat well and to have fun.

I come from a family that told the stories of Chanukah and of Christmas, that could make peace with two traditions, two traditions that had faith in miracles. I will spend the holiday reminding those youth and families who are having a bad time not to give up hope.

If you have ideas how I can be successful, let me know. I rely on others to tell me what I’m forgetting, and perhaps telling me will help you to look after yourselves. We all deserve that.

(Note: I took this photo after the snow on yesterday.)