There’s something about the Samaritan’s #LittleThings campaign that really appeals to me. Every time I see or read their suggestions and material, I am reminded that the best public health measures are simple and straightforward. They are also easy to remember and often easy to manage, so I decided to offer three suggestions, taken from the #LittleThings campaign, everyone can use in a medical or mental health practice that have been proven to be helpful in improving mental health. These would also be useful to anyone struggling with a mental health problem, or their family members.

My first suggestion is to do hospitable things. In our offices and at the reception desks in our program, we leave out water and glasses, snacks and interesting reading material. We keep the space clean and tidy and welcoming. Research shows that people react positively to welcoming situations so positive greetings and just very simple but special items can really help. When I had a private office, we would put out handknit slippers in the winter. People really liked these, especially that my mother had knit them in all sizes for the office. To consider how this works, imagine yourself going to a doctor’s office, and what these are usually like. Then think how it would seem if there were something to drink, a kind voice to greet you, anything that helped you to feel valued and welcomed. I don’t think it’s surprising that the evidence supports that it is good for our mental health when first encounters are positive.

The next suggestion is to learn to listen well. There is a great blog, Just Keep Swimming, written by a person “who uses the mental health service in Ireland”. One of their blogs, The delicate art of listening, contains some good suggestions on how to listen well. There is much being made today of the benefits of health care providers listening to their patients, but all those benefits apply to our personal conversations as well. Again, it seems simplistic but another proven way that we can promote mental health is by listening.

The third suggestion is a little more complicated, because it would involve some expense for a practice or office, but its value psychologically is well established. It is to send personal greetings by regular mail. This is a good suggestion if a family member or friend is living with depression – send them a card or letter from time to time and it will help them to manage the negative feelings. In my practice, at the end of a person’s hospital stay, I will often have patients send themselves a postcard or card to remind them of some fact about themselves or some advice that is positive that they often forget. People in general don’t get real mail any longer and it can be encouraging to receive something personal when you least expect it in the mail.

So that’s it! I imagine some readers are thinking, “Well, that’s just more wellness nonsense. Who bothered to prove that scientifically?” Well, you can find that out in the #LittleThings material also. I have not put the case for wellness activities as a part of healthcare deliveries especially well and maybe I will work on that from a Canadian perspective, but Harry Burns puts it very well in this short piece in New Scientist. Harry Burns is a Professor of global public health at the University of Strathclyde and a former Chief Medical Officer of Scotland. So consider the advice of a public health expert in this and consider some of these suggestions.

2 thoughts on “Mental Health Measures Anyone Can Do

  1. Ann M. Gauvin says:

    What excellent suggestions to make our own in this new year in our homes and in our relationships.
    Ann Gauvin

    1. drgailbeck says:

      The websites are also worth seeing. Thank you, Ann, for reading this and commenting.

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