Seria Una Cruz Verde?

I am watching the news from the Venezuelan election and wondering what I would do if I were a doctor in Venezuela today. The election is the most recent assault on the people of Venezuela by their President, Nicolas Maduro. By the end of the day, or within a few more days, he will become the dictator of Venezuela. The making of a dictator is the undoing of security in a country and many young Venezuelans have seen their country go from being the richest country in South America in the 1980’s to having an 86% poverty rate in 2017.
Since April, over 100 young people have died in protests in Venezuela. That total increased by 19 this weekend as protests over the election intensified. Venezuela’s neighbours, Brazil and Colombia are bracing for a refugee crisis. The country is experiencing a food security crisis and medicines are not at all available.
The scale of the humanitarian crisis was confirmed by Dr. Douglas Leon Natera, President of the Medical Federation of Venezuela. Natera is reaching out to colleagues in the region. This is a communication to Dr. Maite Sevillano, Vice President of the South American Region of Medical Women’s International Association:
“To the friends: The health sector being headed by the doctors is only attending emergencies, trying to continue to give priority to children, pregnant women and the elderly. These resolutions are being followed by 96% of doctors in public services and 85% in private.” (Personal Communication to dra Sevillano)
Venezuelan physicians are especially concerned about the impact on children, who have been most affected by the food insecurity. Also, youth have been the majority killed in protests against the Maduro regime, according to Dr. Natera.
In Venezuela, however, some of the heroes are also young. Medical students and recent graduates of the Central University of Venezuela have banded together as volunteers to provide first aid and whatever care they can to those injured in protests, on both sides. However, despite the group’s impartiality, government forces usually see them as part of the protest. As they help, some have been injured and one of the volunteers was killed. To identify themselves, the volunteers wear white helmets with a green medical cross and carry white flags bearing the same green cross. Cruz Verde (Green Cross) is what they are called and those injured in protests call out for them, and pray for them.
As most of the volunteers are in their twenties, they were born when their country was still wealthy. They have witnessed its disintegration. They are studying – and learning – the basics of public health, emergency medicine and the impact on health of a humanitarian crisis in the most unfortunate way. Their older colleagues, led by Dr. Natera, are also working to provide basic medical care to starving and desperate Venezuelans. When I read about their work and watch youtube videos of their working conditions, my own first world medical concerns dissolve into this philosophical question:
“Seria una Cruz Verde?”

(Photo credit: Christian Science Monitor)

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