Game of Thrones Madness?

For the past few weeks, I have felt as though my husband and sons, not to mention many friends and acquaintances, have joined a cult. As a matter of fact, I often spend Sunday evening with my family, but tonight and for weeks to come everyone I know will spend Sunday evenings with characters from a fictional land.

Here are some of the comments I have heard in the past few weeks leading up to the 7th season of Game of Thrones which starts tonight on HBO:

Question: “What if we tape the whole series and binge watch them all at once for a kind of party?”

Answer: “You can’t do that because you’ll definitely have the plot spoiled by everyone talking about what has happened.”

Question: “If I go away for a week, do you think I should stop following the Twitter feeds and other social medial?”

Answer: “OMG I never thought of that.”

Question: “Do you think we can find out in advance who’s going to be live tweeting during the show and stop following them?”

Answer: “Good idea – and put up warnings for your followers not to post.”

Question: “Dr. Beck, will we be allowed to watch Game of Thrones on the unit?”

Answer: “Is there no escape?”

I know exactly why the series does not appeal to me. I find too much graphic violence disturbing. It’s perverse, but I am more fascinated by trying to understand why certain television series can develop cult-like followings. How does it happen that certain shows can become so popular that there’s no point in even inviting anyone over on a certain day around a certain time unless you’re holding an event related to a certain series. My gourmet dinner club held a Downton Abbey event. I know of people holding Game of Thrones parties as the new season starts.

The research on why certain cultural phenomena become popular indicates that the capacity to identify sympathetically with characters, especially when the story line allows us to struggle with concepts of good and evil, can be cathartic. It can help us to resolve our own conflicts safely, especially if, in discussing a show’s dilemmas with others, we can begin to understand how our friends or family members are themselves resolving conflicts.

The cultural phenomena that are television shows or movies have never been as cathartic for me as those I read and, of course, there is research on that as well. This research considers the reasons why some people are drawn to stories told via one medium over another. Again, this research shows that we are drawn to the medium that most engages our emotions, that allows us to enter the conflict of the story safely, so that we are not overwhelmed. I don’t mind imagining a bloody conflict, but I find it overwhelming to watch. I will also admit that I skip over parts of tv shows or movies that I find too difficult to tolerate, but I never have to do this when I’m reading a story.

Finally, whether you watch or read or listen to a story, stories show us how difficult it is for humans to live in the present, to “enjoy the moment”. We flip to the back of the book. We watch every episode. Do we not all want to know the end of the story, even when the story is good all the way along?

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