Not Just Any Village

In recent months, I have come to learn more and more about the difficulties indigenous youth have in obtaining mental health services. In part, this is because local, provincial and federal news reports are calling attention to these difficulties but I am also very much aware of the needs of these young people in my own community and practice.

It is especially distressing that, despite the goodwill of governments and their financial investment, all the measures that have been taken seem to have no impact. How can this be?

I have come to understand this only in the context of being a mother myself and it is only using this reference point that I can make sense of why our efforts have been so ineffective. Let me see if this helps you to understand what is missing.

Imagine that your child has serious mental health problems. She is twelve years old and started using substances like cannabis, or alcohol, or solvents. (I have seen indigenous youth who started using substances, especially solvents, as young as seven years old.) School is a struggle and because of this, the child feels hopeless about the future. Perhaps as a parent, you can understand this because you were in the same situation at her age. You are desperate for your child to get help and so you agree that she should travel hundreds of miles away from home to get that help. You agree to this even though you will miss her desperately, and worry about her all day, every day. You know she is anxious and will cry because she misses you and her family, but you know that you cannot travel with her because there are other children to care for, or your job, or even because you yourself do not have the emotional strength to support her. Who cannot relate to the desperation of this situation? Of this parent? Of this child?

The research evidence is overwhelming that children’s health depends on family support. It takes the first year of our life to be able to walk. It takes us until we are two to utter a few words. We begin to have the skills to read, and write, and do math around age five. The evidence says that our enormous brains can take until age 25 to fully develop. We clearly need personal support to grow and develop and every culture relies on families to provide that support. When we are unwell, we need that support even more.

How do we expect these children to heal when we send them away from their families? If we must do this, could we not at least set up those sophisticated telehealth networks and facetime for parents and children and grandparents and brothers and sisters to stay in touch? “It takes a village to raise a child” is an African proverb that recognizes the universal truth that we need our families and kin – our village.

When I am having a hard day, I will often count my blessings and the blessings I remember first are the people of my personal village: my children and husband and family and friends.

Do we really believe that indigenous youth (or any youth) will become stronger mentally away from their families? Have we really learned nothing from the experience of those sent away to residential schools? Are we really not listening?

If those African philosophers will permit, I do have one slight modification to their proverb. I agree that it takes a village to raise a child, but not just any village will do. Each child deserves the support of their own village: their own family, their own friends, their own people.

(Photo credit: Family Ties sculpture by Kevin Barrett)

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