Ministers

I am getting pretty fed up with Health Ministers. Ontario’s Minister of Health and Long Term Care, Eric Hoskins, dumped a “deal” on the table for Ontario doctors at 8 a.m. last Wednesday morning. He was in a press conference by 9 a.m. letting the public know that he had offered Ontario doctors more money than he had in August 2016. Not mentioning that the doctors had rejected that August deal, the Minister also neglected to say that he had decided to pit groups of doctors against each other with his most recent offer. His latest “deal” seems to give family physicians an increase at the same time as it cuts the highest paid specialists.

The “increase” to family physicians is very questionable since the terms and conditions to which extra funding is tied are so stringent that doctors would take a loss in order to meet the Minister’s demands. The timing of the offer is also suspect. It follows hard upon the passage of Bill 41, the so-called Patients First Act, which seeks to address problems in Ontario’s health care system with additional bureaucracy and a Command-and-Control approach that is totally unnecessary given the work ethic and devotion of most doctors. The Board of the Ontario Medical Association unanimously condemned the actions of the Government of Ontario and the Minister of Health and Long Term Care.

Hard upon this, now consider the federal government’s “Take it or leave it” offer to the provinces of an “increase” of $11.5 billion for home care and mental health. That’s meant to be an investment over the next TEN YEARS, for all Canadians. That’s an investment of about $300 for every Canadian. This is not more than a week’s worth of home care or 2 sessions with a clinical psychologist. Dr. Granger Avery, the President of the Canadian Medical Association, said, “The Groundhog Day-type discussions where political leaders bat around percentages and figures at meetings in hotels have to stop.”

Really, Ministers, doctors would like to be able to have a real discussion about a health care proposal that you introduce that does not require the use of quotation marks to alert the public to the fact that health ministers and doctors speak a different language, especially where money and patient needs are concerned.

As a physician, I would like to think that there is an opportunity to discuss why these proposals will not meet the needs of my practice. As a patient, I want analysis that demonstrates to me that the investment of my money has been careful and methodical and that investments are linked to outcomes that both my doctors and the government agree on. As a citizen, it is distressing to be a bystander to this grandstanding by legislators. This is people’s healthcare. You are governing. Please consider your proposals with the seriousness they deserve. Please talk with me, not at me.

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