Women’s Rights and Medical Women

Most of us know that the world’s leaders met this past weekend at the United Nations to discuss and commit to sustainable development goals. They formally agreed to a set of goals that they hope to bring to completion by 2030: http://www.un.org/apps/news/story.asp?NewsID=51968#.VgkpN3ldGUk

This was the second agreement of its kind, the first agreement, the United Nations’ Millenium Development Project, was launched in 2000 and, since that time, women’s groups have been measuring the extent to which these lofty goals have been addressed. These goals are outlined here and even a brief review will show that many are related to women’s empowerment and women’s health. The changes with this first set of goal have been so slow that one might wonder whether just building another set of goals will truly help. http://www.un.org/millenniumgoals/2015_MDG_Report/pdf/MDG%202015%20Summary%20web_english.pdf

When one considers the Sustainable Development Goals developed for 2030, wondering if they can possibly be achieved, it is worth looking through the photographs on the link. Once you have, you will realize that most of the leaders discussing these are men. There are a few notable women, like Angela Merkel, but mostly men. Truthfully, on the ground, most of those actually working on the goals, getting their hands dirty and their egos bruised, are women and I want to be sure that their voices were heard and their suggestions included.

Each year at the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women, we gather into our groups and negotiate to improve and strengthen the statement and listen to talks about interventions that are succeeding in one goal. We cobble together an acceptable document only to have some state that does not value women remove certain key proposals or statements. Which states will hold women back? These include some of the Middle Eastern States and, of course, the Holy See.

Both sets of sustainable development goals are embraced by women’s groups for they represented the kind of world we wanted to leave for our children and grandchildren. Whatever the politics, it seemed as if women were more likely to get past it and get on with the work.

Women physicians, through Medical Women’s International Association, have always been involved in the consideration and development of the sustainable development goals. Each year a delegation attends the Commission on the Status of Women and lobbies for the inclusion of the most effective measures. While the progress is slow year to year, it is building. It is building to a point in the same way that women’s suffrage did. While medical women from every corner of the globe come together to provide evidence based care so that more girls and women are able to lead healthy, happy lives in careers of their choice, the world will be a better place.

This past weekend, the Federation of Medical Women of Canada met in Toronto. Like all women physicians groups, they are working toward those goals, focused on those very real Canadian concerns: poverty, domestic violence and, now, the arrival of Syrian refugees. Their numbers wax and wane as women do not always see the value of defending women’s rights until something happens to them personally to remind them that there are still barriers to woman’s advancement and equality.

At this Federation meeting, Canada’s women doctors were joined by doctors from around the world, the Executive Committee of Medical Women’s International Association. This group includes not only North American women but also women from Europe, Asia, Africa and South America. This group knows the hardship women face in getter better healthcare for themselves and their families on a daily basis and they work to improve health conditions for all.

These women are today’s suffragettes, although they are fighting for women’s status not just votes. They are also no longer going on hunger strikes. Rather, they are travelling to the United Nations and the World Health Organization and to the corners of the globe to ensure that there is a strong healthcare cornerstone in the building of women’s empowerment. Take a look at their website www.mwia.net Be inspired!

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